Tuesday, June 13, 2017

Acer Aspire R7-570 Keyboard Replacement Guide


I decided to write my first repair guide as I found that there were no other tutorials for this on the web, excepting this write up

While I found it very helpful, some misunderstanding almost led me to break the replacement keyboard. 

Note that the order in which I removed parts may not be optimal, and that while some can be removed in any order, others cannot.

Disclaimer: Attempt this repair at your own risk. I am not responsible for your actions.


You'll need a T9 torx screwdriver and a regular Phillips. Below is what I worked with.


Follow this guide to remove the back cover. 


Part 1: Removing the Motherboard


After removing the back cover, remove the battery connector and take out the battery. 


1. Remove the screws holding the HDD to the motherboard. Lift up the silver flap on the right and pull left to disconnect.


2. Remove the tape covering the left speaker connector.


3. Remove the left speaker connector and screws. 


4. Remove the connector and screws from the right speaker. 


5. Remove the left port module and bottom LED module ribbon connectors and screws. 



6. Remove the connector under the yellow tape and set the cable off to the side. 
(can be done later) 


7. Detach the WiFi connectors and remove the single screw. 



8. Remove the two display connectors. 


9. Remove the screws connecting the heat sink. Replacing the thermal paste under the heat sink is your call.


10. Remove the screws connecting the fan and the fan connector. Also detach the blue ribbon cable.
Do not remove the fan. 


11. Remove the top left module connector. 


12. Remove the keyboard connectors.


13. Remove the 3 (or more) screws holding down the motherboard. 
(Note the Wi-Fi module should already be removed)


14. Shift the fan to the left as shown to uncover the motherboard. 


15. The mobo should now be ready for removal excepting a single connector on the bottom side. 
I did not remove this connector, I just moved the mobo out of the way of the keyboard. 


Part 2: Removing the Keyboard

I believe there are around 50 screws to be removed here. 
I would take note of the locations of the screws you remove. 
(I drew circles on paper and set them inside the circles)


1. Remove the screws holding down the right shield. 


2. Remove the screws holding down the left shield. 


3. Remove the microphone with the help of a flathead as shown.


4. Remove the screws holding down the center shield. 

5
5. Remove all screws in center and carefully lift the black ribbon cable. 



7. Lift the keyboard as shown.


DO NOT remove the clear plastic from the black as I halfway did (luckily without damaging anything), misunderstanding the original write up linked at the top. 

 

8. Remove all screws around the edges. 

9. Remove all remaining center screws and make note of their locations. (I used a sharpie)


After removing all screws the keyboard can be removed.
These steps can be repeated in reverse order to rebuild the machine. 

Here is a clearer shot of where the center screws go on the replacement board. 

H

All parts dismantled: 


All back together! 


tags: removal, repair, tutorial, laptop, 5893


Update June 2017

testtestwillupdatelater

Thursday, August 11, 2016

I started my first computer gig. I am the only employee here under my boss. I'm troubleshooting basic hardware and software.

My interview for the job consisted of me clean installing Windows 10 on machines that previously held Linux OS's. I had manually cleaned and reformatted the disks using the command line DiskPart utility.

During the first week I started cleaning up computers with utilities such as CCleaner, Microsoft Security Essentials, TDSSKiller, ADWCleaner and MalwareBytes. I spent time removing adware and bad Chrome extensions, installing drivers on new computers, setting up printers, and troubleshooting basic software problems clients had. I also created a network share from Windows XP to Windows 10 for one client. The biggest refresher that week was how easy malware can spread...

So far in this second week I have learned how to use and customize Tronscript to automate a lot of the PC cleanup process and made a backup with a Seagate External drive for the first time. I've started researching how to use Clonezilla to make and restore images as well.

Thursday, July 21, 2016


Most ransomware involves encrypting the host's data and then demanding a ransom for decryption.
I was trying to think of a less complicated way to achieve the same effect with less code and necessary permissions.

Instead of encrypting the data or transferring it to the attacker's computer, why not just keep it on the victim's machine and hide it,
with only one line of code.

mv -f /home ./Documents/.testy

Where the targets home directory is moved to a hidden directory in a different folder. An attacker could simply tell the victim that the data has been taken and demand a ransom, it is unlikely that the victim would think that someone would pull such a simple trick on them. However it's a one-trick pony so it's a bit lacking in the usefulness department.

Ransomware


Most ransomware involves encrypting the host's data and then demanding a ransom for decryption.
I was trying to think of a less complicated way to achieve the same effect with less code and necessary permissions.

Instead of encrypting the data or transferring it to the attacker's computer, why not just keep it on the victim's machine and hide it,
with only one line of code.

mv -f /home ./Documents/.testy

Where the targets home directory is moved to a hidden directory in a different folder. An attacker could simply tell the victim that the data has been taken and demand a ransom, it is unlikely that the victim would think that someone would pull such a simple trick on them. However it's a one-trick pony so it's a bit lacking in the usefulness department.

Friday, June 10, 2016

Backing up Google Data from a Second Account

Google offers a service called Takeout as a way to make backups of all your Google data. It’s great that they offer this, but I think there could be a more secure way to secure all of your data and account.


Here’s my idea. Google should offer a secondary account as a failsafe comprised of a secondary email address and password with a duplicate of all of your data. The second account would be private, you and only you would only know of its existence and you would use a password that you had never used before and would never use again. In the event your main account is compromised, you would be able to log into your second account to use as your new account, or alternatively, regain access to the first account from the second account.


Although this isn’t an available option, there are a few methods I’ve found to provide the same  redundancy for most data as that idea. Create a second private account, and choose to share all folders in Google Drive with that account with full ownership. And of course, set up your second private Gmail to have all mail from your main account forwarded to it, creating a safe cloud storage option.

I find it hard to believe anyone could access my account with two-step verification, but they say it’s not a matter of if you get hacked, it’s when you get hacked.

Tuesday, May 24, 2016

Wrote this shell script today for Ubuntu.

#!/bin/bash
#this script autobacks up encrypted and nonencrypted files to a USB flash drive.
#it assumes dirs exist
#and files filearrived and file2arrived exist on unencrypted and encrypted respectively
#and your USB is plugged into the first port
#personalized config:
#subsitute anybody for your username
#substitute encrypt64 for the folder you want your USB mounted at on your Home dir
#subsitute Documents for the folder you want encrypted
#substitute "files" for the folder you want unencrypted
#When you want to view your encrypted files run this command alone
# sudo mount -t ecryptfs  /home/anybody/encrypt64 /home/anybody/encrypt64

echo
read -p "is ecryptfs installed?" -n 1 -r
echo
if [[ ! $REPLY =~ ^[Yy]$ ]]
then
sudo apt-get install ecryptfs-utils
fi
echo
echo "Headed to home dir"
cd
echo "making sure ecrypt is unmounted"
sudo umount /home/anybody/encrypt64
sudo umount /dev/sdb1
echo
echo "mounting usb"
sudo mount /dev/sdb1 /home/anybody/encrypt64
echo
echo "checking mount point"
df -h | grep sdb1
echo

echo
read -p "Copy unencrypted files?" -n 1 -r
echo
if [[ $REPLY =~ ^[Yy]$ ]]
then
echo
echo "copying unencrypted"
sudo cp -r files encrypt64
echo
echo "checking unencrypted arrived, user should check date modified"
ls -l --sort=time encrypt64/files | grep filearrived
echo
fi

read -p "Copy and encrypt files?" -n 1 -r
echo
if [[ $REPLY =~ ^[Yy]$ ]]
then
echo "starting encryption"
sudo mount -t ecryptfs  /home/anybody/encrypt64 /home/anybody/encrypt64
echo
echo "copying encrypted documents"
echo
sudo cp -fr Documents /home/anybody/encrypt64
echo "checking encrypted arrived, user should check date modified"
ls -l --sort=time /home/anybody/encrypt64/Documents | grep file2arrived
echo
echo "stopping encryption"
sudo umount /home/anybody/encrypt64
echo "checking if encrypted success, you should see random characters"
tail -n1 /home/anybody/encrypt64/Documents/file2arrived
echo
fi
date
who
echo
read -p "Run last check?(optional)" -n 1 -r
echo
if [[ $REPLY =~ ^[Yy]$ ]]
then
sudo mount -t ecryptfs  /home/anybody/encrypt64 /home/anybody/encrypt64
cat encrypt64/Documents/file2arrived
sudo umount /home/anybody/encrypt64
echo "you should be able to read the file above"
fi
echo "ecryptfs has been unmounted."
echo
echo "operation complete"